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Is there a need for project governance?

Part of the Contributions to Economics book series (CE)

Keywords

Corporate Governance Project Management Development Project Information Asymmetry Development Sector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Translated by Bynner (1944).Google Scholar
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    This phrasing follows Drucker’s on the role of management: “Without leadership ‘the resources of production’ remain resources and never become production” (1999: 3).Google Scholar
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    Peter Ulrich refers to this as a responsibility gap, see Ulrich P. 2002: 118. According to Ulrich, management has a role to play in providing guiding principles and values which help overcome episodes of opportunism like the one in the case example.Google Scholar
  8. 45.
    See, for instance, Thommen 2002, Lennertz 2002, Grün 1992.Google Scholar
  9. 46.
    For the Project Management Book of Knowledge (or PMBOK Guide), see PMI 2004. Comprehensive overviews can also be found in Kupper (2001) and Harrison & Lock (2004). Furthermore, see Führer & Züger (2005), Fiedler (2001), Lester (2000) or Bainey (2004).Google Scholar
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    Interesting insights on IT Project Management can be found in Gomez et al. (2002) or Buchta, Eul & Schulte-Croonenberg (2004).Google Scholar
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    Rollins & Lanza highlight a total absence of project focus on internal control under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act: The emphatic understanding of internal controls (adopted from the COSO report — Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission) “makes no mention of reviewing projects as part of their internal control reporting framework.” Moreover, as “most [controlling] professionals are not trained in project and program management, [...] many companies will go without reporting project fraud until after it is too late.” (2005: 8).Google Scholar
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  62. 119.
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© Physica-Verlag Heidelberg 2007

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