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Wage Bargaining Institutions in Europe. A Happy Marriage or Preparing for Divorce?

  • Jelle Visser
Part of the AIEL Series in Labour Economics book series (AIEL)

Keywords

Trade Union Collective Bargaining Industrial Relation Union Membership Union Density 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Physica-Verlag Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jelle Visser
    • 1
  1. 1.University of AmsterdamThe Netherlands

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