Introduction to Fuzziology

  • Vlad Dimitrov
Conference paper
Part of the Studies in Fuzziness and Soft Computing book series (STUDFUZZ, volume 81)


In a broad sense, fuzziness is the opposite of precision. Everything that cannot be defined precisely (that is, according to some broadly accepted criteria or norms of precision) and everything that has no clearly described boundaries in space or time is considered a bearer of fuzziness. In a narrow sense, fuzziness relates to the definition of fuzzy sets [1] as proposed by Zadeh in 1965: sets, the belongingness to which is measured by a membership function whose values are between 1 (full belongingness) and 0 (non-belongingness).


Fuzzy Logic Social Complexity Impossibility Theorem Adaptive Resonance Theory Human Creativity 


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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vlad Dimitrov
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Western SydneyRichmondAustralia

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