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Compositional Design and Maintenance of Broker Agents

  • C. M. Jonker
  • J. Treur
Part of the Studies in Fuzziness and Soft Computing book series (STUDFUZZ, volume 98)

Abstract

In this chapter a generic broker agent architecture is introduced and designed in a principled manner using the compositional development method for multi-agent systems DESIRE. A flexible and easily adaptable agent architecture is implemented including automated support of the agents own maintenance. Therefore, the agent is not only easily adaptable, but it shows its adaptive behaviour to meet new requirements, supported by communication with a maintenance agent.

Keywords

Agent Architecture Knowledge Element Process Composition Provider Agent Incoming Communication 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. M. Jonker
  • J. Treur

There are no affiliations available

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