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Teaming Human and Machine: A Conceptual Framework

  • Pierre Urlings
  • Lakhmi C. Jain
Part of the Advances in Soft Computing book series (AINSC, volume 14)

Abstract

Advances in automation and especially artificial intelligence have enabled the formation of rather unique teams with human and (electronic) machine members. This paper proposes a conceptual framework for teaming human and machine. The basis of this framework will be the introduction of the machine into the traditional situation where the human is solely responsible for managing, control and execution of all activities. Focus will be on the identification and classification of activities to be allocated to the machine. Task management and coordination between human and machine will be identified as a specific area of research and design concern.

Keywords

Information Processing Technique Crew Resource Management Operator Assistant Cial Neural Network Blackboard System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pierre Urlings
    • 2
  • Lakhmi C. Jain
    • 1
  1. 1.Knowledge-Based Intelligent Engineering Systems Centre, School of Electrical and Information EngineeringUniversity of South AustraliaAustralia
  2. 2.Air Operations Division, Aeronautical and Maritime Research LaboratoryDefence Science and Technology OrganisationAustralia

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