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The Value Added of Representative Comparative EU Data on Operating Hours, Working Times, Capacity Utilisation and Employment

  • Lei Delsen
  • Derek Bosworth
  • Hermann Groß
  • Rafael Muñoz de Bustillo y Llorente
Part of the Contributions to Economics book series (CE)

Keywords

European Union Service Sector Capital Stock Shift Work Capacity Utilisation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Physica-Verlag Heidelberg 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lei Delsen
    • 1
  • Derek Bosworth
    • 2
  • Hermann Groß
    • 3
  • Rafael Muñoz de Bustillo y Llorente
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsRadboud University Nijmegenthe Netherlands
  2. 2.University of ManchesterManchester
  3. 3.Sozialforschungsstelle DortmundGermany
  4. 4.University of SalamancaSpain

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