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Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and driving safety

  • Daniel J. Cox
  • Margaret Taylor Davis

Abstract

This chapter reviews the diagnosis and symptoms of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), the extent to which the occurrence of ADHD is related to elevated risk of driving mishaps, a theoretical model concerning how these symptoms and their appropriate medical management impact on driving safety, and both the advantages and disadvantages of ADHD medication management.

Keywords

Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry ORQJ Whup Increase Collision Risk 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag/Switzerland 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel J. Cox
    • 1
  • Margaret Taylor Davis
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences and Internal MedicineUniversity of Virginia Health Services, Box 800-223CharlottesvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences, Virginia Driving Safety LaboratoryUniversity of Virginia Health ServicesCharlottesvilleUSA

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