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Physiological responses of two arabidopsis thaliana isolates, N1438 and Col, to different salts

  • Hela Mahmoudi
  • Houneida Attia
  • Imen Tarchoun
  • Zeineb Ouerghi
  • Mokhtar Lachaâl
Conference paper

Abstract

Growth inhibition by salt stress in glycophytes like Arabidopsis thaliana is associated with a significant accumulation of Na+ and Cl- in rosette leaves and to a reduction of their supply of essential nutrients such as potassium and calcium. In the present work, we attempted to evaluate the contribution of each of these factors to changes in the physiological functions of the species. The experiments were carried out under greenhouse conditions. Three-week old plants of A. thaliana from Col and N1438 isolates were cultivated for 17 days in a basal medium supplemented with either 12.5 mM Na2SO4,12.5 mM K2SO4, 25 mM NaCl, or 25 mM KCl. A salt-free medium was used as control. On harvesting, plants were cut into rosette leaves, bolts, and roots, and their fresh and dry weights, water contents, and major nutrient contents were determined. In Col, growth was decreased more by K+ salts (KCl and K2SO4) than by Na+ salts (NaCl and Na2SO4), and more by K2SO4 than by KCl, whereas in N1438, no difference was observed between the different salt treatments. Sodium was primarily accumulated in shoots, where it was probably compartmentalized into vacuoles, since it seemed to participate in osmotic adjustment. The growth sensitivity of Col to K+ salt treatments was associated with excessive accumulation of K+ in plant tissues. In conclusion, the variability of salt responses in A. thaliana was more dependent on cations (Na+ or K+) than on their associate anions (Cl- or SO4 2-).

Keywords

Salt Stress Sodium Salt Salt Treatment Osmotic Adjustment Potassium Salt 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag/Switzerland 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hela Mahmoudi
    • 1
  • Houneida Attia
    • 1
  • Imen Tarchoun
    • 1
  • Zeineb Ouerghi
    • 1
  • Mokhtar Lachaâl
    • 1
  1. 1.Unité de Physiologie et Biochimie de la Tolérance au Sel des Plantes, Département de Biologie, FSTCampus UniversitaireTunisTunisie

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