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Evaluation of arid salt marsh restoration techniques

  • Lee Weishar
  • Ian Watt
  • David A. Jones
  • David Aubrey

Abstract

The 1991 Gulf War resulted in the deliberate release of unprecedented quantities of oil into the Gulf. The degradation of over 750 km of shoreline and adjacent wetlands within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia was the consequence. The beaches, tide flats, lagoons, rocky shores, and salt marshes along the Kingdom’s Gulf shoreline remain severely more than a decade after the oil release. As part of the Remediation Technology Assessment Project (RTA) (Weishar et al. 2004) the applicability of various remediation technologies on salt marsh ecosystems was evaluated. A demonstration restoration project was designed to restore an arid salt marsh after collecting and assessing baseline biological, chemical, and sediment data. The most effective restoration included removal of surface tarcrete/oil impregnated microbial mats, construction of new tidal channels, and transplantation of native species.

Keywords

Salt Marsh Tidal Channel Test Plot Tidal Flushing Marsh Plain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag/Switzerland 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lee Weishar
    • 1
  • Ian Watt
    • 2
  • David A. Jones
    • 3
  • David Aubrey
    • 1
  1. 1.Woods Hole GroupEast FalmouthUSA
  2. 2.IOMEC Grand GaubeMauritius
  3. 3.School of Ocean SciencesUniversity of WalesBangorUK

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