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Systemic glucocorticoids in rheumatoid arthritis

  • John R. Kirwan
  • Mark G. Perry
Part of the Progress in Inflammation Research book series (PIR)

Abstract

Glucocorticoids have been therapeutic agents in rheumatology since 1948, when Philip S Hench first used compound E (later renamed cortisone) to successfully treat a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) [1, 2]. Over the intervening years, opinions about glucocorticoids have varied from excitement to complete rejection. Most of the worries concerning their use have been about adverse effects. Despite this historical variability in rheumatological opinion, many patients in practice are prescribed glucocorticoids. Here we review new evidence on the mechanisms of action of glucocorticoids, outcomes of glucocorticoid treatment and adverse effects, and propose an evidence based approach to their effective use in the management of rheumatoid arthritis.

Keywords

Rheumatoid Arthritis Bone Mineral Density Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Systemic Glucocorticoid Cortisone Acetate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag Basel/Switzerland 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • John R. Kirwan
    • 1
  • Mark G. Perry
    • 1
  1. 1.Academic Rheumatology, Bristol Royal InfirmaryUniversity of BristolBristolUK

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