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The neural bases of haptic working memory

  • Amanda L. Kaas
  • M. Cornelia Stoeckel
  • Rainer Goebel

Abstract

When deciding which kiwi fruit or pear needs eating first or which drink has the right temperature to be consumed on a warm day, we are likely to explore and compare hardness or temperature using our hands. The process that enables us to keep the relevant information active for task performance over a short period of time is called ‘working memory’ (WM) [1]. WM allows us to hold stimulus characteristics on-line to guide behaviour in the absence of external cues or prompts [2]. Without active WM, initial oercepts decay quickly with different time constants for different input modalities (Box 1).

Keywords

Work Memory Work Memory Capacity Memory Load Neural Base Brodmann Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested reading

  1. Myake A, Shah P (eds) (1999) Models of working memory: mechanisms of active maintenance and executive control. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amanda L. Kaas
    • 1
  • M. Cornelia Stoeckel
    • 2
  • Rainer Goebel
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Faculty of PsychologyMaastricht UniversityMaastrichtThe Netherlands
  2. 2.J R Hospital, Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain (FMRIB)University of OxfordOxfordUK
  3. 3.Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Faculty of PsychologyMaastricht UniversityMaastrichtThe Netherlands

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