Advertisement

Vestibular sensory substitution using tongue electrotactile display

  • Yuri P. Danilov
  • Mitchell E. Tyler
  • Kurt A. Kaczmarek

Abstract

Sensory substitution systems provide their users with environmental information through a human sensory channel different from that normally used. For example, a person who is blind may use a long cane to detect obstacles while walking and Braille or raised-line graphics to read information normally received visually. A person who is deaf may read lips to understand speech. A person without vision or hearing may use a method called Tadoma, placing his or her hands over the face and neck of a speaker to understand speech [1]. Persons with an impaired vestibular (balance) system use their hands, not primarily for mechanical support, but to sense how they move relative to their environment. Electronic sensors and tactile (touch) displays enable more sophisticated applications for sensory substitution. In this chapter we will briefly review visual and auditory sensory substitution, as well as tactile feedback in robotic systems, followed by an extended discussion of vestibular sensory substitution.

Keywords

Hair Cell Semicircular Canal Rotary Acceleration Vestibular Disorder Tactile Display 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Recommended reading

  1. Bach-y-Rita P (1972) Brain mechanisms in sensory substitution. Academic, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  2. Kaczmarek KA, Bach-y-Rita P (1995) Tactile displays. In: W Barfield, T Furness (eds): Virtual environments and advanced interface design. Oxford University Press, New York, 349–414Google Scholar
  3. Kaczmarek KA, Webster JG, Bach-y-Rita P, Tompkins WJ (1991) Electrotactile and vibrotactile displays for sensory substitution systems. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 38: 1–16PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Loomis JM (2003) Sensory replacement and sensory substitution: Overview and prospects for the future. In: MC Roco, WS Bainbridge (eds): Converging technologies for improving human performance: nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology and cognitive science. Kluwer Academic, BostonGoogle Scholar
  5. Saunders FA (1977) Recommended procedures for electrocutaneous displays. In: FT Hambrecht, JB Reswick (eds): Functional electrical stimulation: applications in neural prostheses. Marcel Dekker, New York, 303–309Google Scholar
  6. Szeto AYJ, Riso RR (1990) Sensory feedback using electrical stimulation of the tactile sense. In: RV Smith, JH Leslie Jr (eds): Rehabilitation engineering. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 29–78Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuri P. Danilov
    • 1
  • Mitchell E. Tyler
    • 2
  • Kurt A. Kaczmarek
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation MedicineUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  2. 2.Ortho-Rehabilitation MedicineUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA

Personalised recommendations