Advertisement

Design guidelines for generating force feedback on fingertips using haptic interfaces

  • Carlo Alberto Avizzano
  • Antonio Frisoli
  • Massimo Bergamasco

Abstract

Manipulation and grasping have key importance in most types of interactions between humans and the world surrounding them [1, 2]. Even if almost all existing haptic interfaces provide a user interaction based on a single contact point, an increased number of contact points, not only allows to display a more natural haptic interaction [3, 4], but also improves the quality of interaction that users can perform in the environment. Haptic exploration is highly dependent on the number of fingers used for exploration of common objects [5], the largest difference appearing between the ‘one finger’ and the ‘two fingers’ conditions [6], and as proven by Jansson et al. [7] by the ability to discriminate a precise tactile pattern during the exploration. In [8], we found an experimental confirmation of this hypothesis: the haptic exploration do not improve with the increase of contact points, from one to two fingers.

Keywords

Grip Force Force Feedback Virtual Object Haptic Device Sharp Feature 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Selected readings

  1. Kapandji IA (1982) The physiology of the joints, volume I: upper limbs. ElsevierGoogle Scholar
  2. Johansson RS, Westling G (1984) Roles of glabrous skin receptors and sensorimotor memory in automatic control of precision grip when lifting rougher or more slippery objects. Exp Brain Res 56(3): 550–564PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Zilles CB, Salisbury JK (1995) A constraint-based godobject method for haptic display. Proc. IEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems 146–151Google Scholar
  4. Bergamasco M, Salsedo F, Fontana M, Tarri F, Avizzano CA, Frisoli A, Ruffaldi E, Marcheschi S (2007) High performance haptic device for force rendering in textile exploration. The Visual Computer 23: 1–11CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Robles-De-La-Torre G, Hayward V (2001) Force can overcome object geometry in the perception of shape through active touch. Nature 412: 445–448PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carlo Alberto Avizzano
    • 1
  • Antonio Frisoli
    • 1
  • Massimo Bergamasco
    • 1
  1. 1.PERCRO LaboratoryScuola Superiore Sant’AnnaPisaItaly

Personalised recommendations