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Carotenoids pp 67-82 | Cite as

Supplements

  • Alan Mortensen
Part of the Carotenoids book series (CAROT, volume 5)

Abstract

Dietary supplements are used either to increase the intake of dietary nutrients, such as vitamins, or to provide nutrients that are not usually found in foods, e.g. in the form of herbal extracts. Supplements in the form of vitamin pills have been known for decades. Supplements of non-essential nutrients are also widely available. The use of dietary supplements has become so widely accepted that they can be found in supermarkets alongside basic food items. Carotenoids are ubiquitous in a diet rich in fruits and vegetables. Thus, supplements containing carotenoids are intended either to boost carotenoid intake in individuals already well supplied with carotenoids from their diet, or to provide carotenoids to those whose diet contains only low amounts of them.

Keywords

Dietary Supplement Health Claim Carotenoid Supplement Erythropoietic Protoporphyria Natural Carotenoid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag Basel 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Mortensen
    • 1
  1. 1.Color Division Chr. HansenProduct DevelopmentHørsholmDenmark

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