Advertisement

Searching for the H-Dibaryon at Brookhaven

  • B. Bassalleck
  • M. Athanas
  • P. D. Barnes
  • A. Berdoz
  • A. Biglan
  • J. Birchall
  • T. Bürger
  • M. Burger
  • R. E. Chrien
  • C. Davis
  • G. E. Diebold
  • H. En’yo
  • H. Fischer
  • G. B. Franklin
  • J. Franz
  • L. Gan
  • D. Gill
  • T. Iijima
  • K. Imai
  • P. Koran
  • M. Landry
  • L. Lee
  • J. Lowe
  • R. Magahiz
  • A. Masaike
  • C. A. Meyer
  • R. McCrady
  • F. Merrill
  • J. M. Nelson
  • K. Okada
  • S. Page
  • P. H. Pile
  • B. Quinn
  • D. Ramsay
  • E. Rössle
  • A. Rusek
  • M. Rozon
  • R. Sawafta
  • H. Schmitt
  • R. A. Schumacher
  • R. L. Stearns
  • R. Stotzer
  • R. Sukaton
  • V. Sum
  • R. Sutter
  • J. J. Szymanski
  • F. Takeutchi
  • W. T. H. van Oers
  • D. M. Wolfe
  • K. Yamamoto
  • M. Yosoi
  • V. Zeps
  • R. Zybert
Part of the Few-Body Systems book series (FEWBODY, volume 9)

Abstract

At the Brookhaven AGS several experiments are searching for the unique strangeness S = −2 H-dibaryon with the quark composition (uuddss). The E813/E836 collaboration, in particular, is using a high-intensity, separated 1.8 GeV/c K beam and two different target configurations. In E836 the reaction K + 3He→K + + H + n is used to search for a relatively deeply-bound H. Complementary to E836 the reactions K + pΞ + K +, followed by , d)atomH + n are used to search near twice the A mass. The status of these two experiments is summarized, and other H-dibaryon searches are briefly reviewed.

Keywords

Skyrme Model Particle Identification Target Configuration Flavor Singlet Hadronic Mass Spectrum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    R. L. Jaffe: Phys. Rev. Lett. 38, 195 (1977);MathSciNetADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. R. L. Jaffe: Phys. Rev. Lett. 38, 1617 (E) (1977)ADSGoogle Scholar
  3. 2.
    M.A. Moinester et al.: Phys. Rev. C46, 1082 (1992)ADSGoogle Scholar
  4. 3.
    P.H. Pile et al.: Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A321, 48 (1992)ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 4.
    A.T.M. Aerts and C.B. Dover: Phys. Rev. D29, 433 (1984)ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 5.
    F. Merrill: Ph.D. dissertation. Carnegie Mellon University 1995Google Scholar
  7. 6.
    A.T.M. Aerts and C.B. Dover: Phys. Rev. D28, 450 (1983)ADSGoogle Scholar
  8. 7.
    A.S. Carroll et al.: Phys. Rev. Lett. 41, 777 (1978)ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 8.
    A.J. Schwartz: SLAC-Report-444, p.393 (1993)Google Scholar
  10. 9.
    R. Longacre: Proc. of Quark Matter ’85Google Scholar
  11. 10.
    J. Sandweiss et al.: AGS E864Google Scholar
  12. 11.
    H. Crawford et al.: AGS E896Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Bassalleck
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Athanas
    • 3
  • P. D. Barnes
    • 9
  • A. Berdoz
    • 3
  • A. Biglan
    • 3
  • J. Birchall
    • 11
  • T. Bürger
    • 4
  • M. Burger
    • 4
  • R. E. Chrien
    • 2
  • C. Davis
    • 11
  • G. E. Diebold
    • 14
  • H. En’yo
    • 7
  • H. Fischer
    • 12
  • G. B. Franklin
    • 3
  • J. Franz
    • 4
  • L. Gan
    • 11
  • D. Gill
    • 10
  • T. Iijima
    • 7
  • K. Imai
    • 7
  • P. Koran
    • 3
  • M. Landry
    • 11
  • L. Lee
    • 11
  • J. Lowe
    • 1
    • 12
  • R. Magahiz
    • 3
  • A. Masaike
    • 7
  • C. A. Meyer
    • 3
  • R. McCrady
    • 3
  • F. Merrill
    • 3
  • J. M. Nelson
    • 1
  • K. Okada
    • 8
  • S. Page
    • 11
  • P. H. Pile
    • 2
  • B. Quinn
    • 3
  • D. Ramsay
    • 11
  • E. Rössle
    • 4
  • A. Rusek
    • 12
  • M. Rozon
    • 3
  • R. Sawafta
    • 2
  • H. Schmitt
    • 4
  • R. A. Schumacher
    • 3
  • R. L. Stearns
    • 13
  • R. Stotzer
    • 12
  • R. Sukaton
    • 3
  • V. Sum
    • 11
  • R. Sutter
    • 2
  • J. J. Szymanski
    • 5
  • F. Takeutchi
    • 8
  • W. T. H. van Oers
    • 11
  • D. M. Wolfe
    • 12
  • K. Yamamoto
    • 7
  • M. Yosoi
    • 7
  • V. Zeps
    • 6
  • R. Zybert
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Phys.U. of BirminghamBirminghamUK
  2. 2.Brookhaven National LabUpton, Long IslandUSA
  3. 3.Dept. of Phys.Carnegie Mellon U.PittsburghUSA
  4. 4.Fakultät f. PhysikU. of FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  5. 5.Indiana U. Cyclotron FacilityBloomingtonUSA
  6. 6.Dept. of Phys.U. of KentuckyLexingtonUSA
  7. 7.Dept. of Phys.Kyoto U.Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto 606Japan
  8. 8.Faculty of ScienceKyoto Sangyo U.Kyoto 603Japan
  9. 9.Los Alamos National LabLos AlamosUSA
  10. 10.TRIUMFVancouverCanada
  11. 11.Dept. of Phys.U. of ManitobaWinnipegCanada
  12. 12.Dept. of Phys.U. of New MexicoAlbuquerqueUSA
  13. 13.Dept. of Phys.Vassar CollegePoughkeepsieUSA
  14. 14.Phys. Dept.Yale U.New HavenUSA

Personalised recommendations