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The Application Of Petri Nets To Represent And Reason About Human Factors Problems During Accident Analyses

  • Chris Johnson
Part of the Eurographics book series (EUROGRAPH)

Abstract

Accident reports are intended to ensure that failures do not recur. They contain the analysis of many different experts, including human factors and systems engineers. The insights of these investigators are often separated into chapters that reflect the particular concerns and expertise of their authors. Such a separation often makes it difficult for readers to trace the ways in which human and system ‘failures’ combine to create the necessary conditions for an accident. The following paper argues that mathematically based modelling techniques can be used to overcome this problem. It is hypothesised that the application of formal notations can be extended from the domain of systems engineering in order to represent the findings of human factors analyses. In particular, it is argued that Petri Nets can be used to represent and reason about the concurrent behaviour of multiple operators and their systems. Tool support can be recruited to validate the resulting nets. The sequences of events leading to an accident can be simulated and shown to human factors and systems engineers. This, in turn, may elicit further observations about the causes of an accident. A near collision analysed by the U.K. Department of Transport’s Air Accident Investigations Branch (AAIB) is used in order to evaluate this approach.

Keywords

Human Factor Crew Member Input Place Output Place Accident Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chris Johnson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computing ScienceUniversity of GlasgowGlasgowUK

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