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Interaction and Task Requirements

  • D. J. Duke
  • M. D. Harrison
Part of the Eurographics book series (EUROGRAPH)

Abstract

Novel interaction techniques required for particular work domains or user communities may interfere with the functional or task-oriented requirements that a system is intended to support. This paper suggests that potential conflicts between these two types of requirements can be identified early in the design process through the use of appropriate specification techniques. Here ‘appropriate’ means both that the structures used to express the specification must be able to represent perceivable elements of the system, and that the process through which the specification is constructed must allow for multi-disciplinary insight into the design problem. This paper explores the relationship between a specification and user requirements in the early stages of the design process of a multi-modal user interface.

Keywords

Natural Language Formal Method Direct Manipulation Work Domain Active Query 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. J. Duke
    • 1
  • M. D. Harrison
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Computer ScienceUniversity of YorkHeslington, YorkUK

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