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A Two-Pass Solution to the Rendering Equation with a Source Visibility Preprocess

  • Kurt Zimmerman
  • Peter Shirley
Part of the Eurographics book series (EUROGRAPH)

Abstract

The grand challenge for the global illumination community is the successful rendering of complex scenes containing arbitrary reflectance properties and numerous light sources. Even for completely diffuse scenes, high geometric complexity and large numbers of light sources present a problem which current algorithms cannot solve in a practical amount of time. However, recent research by Rushmeier et. al. [7] utilizes geometric simplification to offer a promising solution to the problem of high geometric complexity and work by Shirley et. al. [9, 10] presents shadow ray optimization techniques for efficient handling of large numbers of luminaires. We present an approach which combines and improves upon ideas from these works. Our work adds to the growing toolbox of importance sampling techniques used in realistic image synthesis (e.g. [4, 14]).

Keywords

Computer Graphic Global Illumination Geometric Simplification Indirect Illumination Eurographics Workshop 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kurt Zimmerman
    • 1
  • Peter Shirley
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA
  2. 2.Program of Computer GraphicsCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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