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B-lymphocytes are predominantely involved in viral propagation of hepatitis C virus (HCV)

  • H. M. Müller
  • B. Kallinowski
  • C. Solbach
  • L. Theilmann
  • T. Goeser
  • E. Pfaff
Conference paper
Part of the Archives of Virology Supplementum book series (ARCHIVES SUPPL, volume 9)

Summary

Recent reports have shown that HCV infection is not only restricted to hepatocytes. Like hepatitis B virus (HBV), which also was thought to be strictly hepatotropic in early molecular and cellular investigations, infection of lymphoid cells by HCV in vivo has been demonstrated. We showed that total peripheral blood leukocytes of chronically HCV-infected patients are infected by detection of plus- and minus- stranded HCV RNA using strand-specific oligonucleotide primers in the RT-PCR. These cells also represent extrahepatic sites for the viral replication, as demonstrated by incorporation of [3H]-uridine into nascent RNA after stimulation of the cells with a mitogen. Furthermore, total PBML from an uninfected person could be infected in vitro using an HCV-positive serum. It could be shown that replication of HCV RNA takes place in these cells. Examination of different subsets of PBML showed predominant infection of B-lymphocytes during HCV disease. Additionally, infection of T-lymphocytes was detected in about 50% of all chronically HCV-infected patients.

Keywords

Southern Blot Hybridization Active Viral Replication Uridine Incorporation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. M. Müller
    • 1
  • B. Kallinowski
    • 1
  • C. Solbach
    • 1
  • L. Theilmann
    • 1
  • T. Goeser
    • 1
  • E. Pfaff
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergFederal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Federal Research Centre for Virus Diseases of AnimalsTübingenFederal Republic of Germany

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