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In vivo transfection by hepatitis A virus synthetic RNA

  • S. U. Emerson
  • M. Lewis
  • S. Govindarajan
  • M. Shapiro
  • T. Moskal
  • R. H. Purcell
Conference paper
Part of the Archives of Virology Supplementum book series (ARCHIVES SUPPL, volume 9)

Summary

Marmosets injected intrahepatically with nucleic acids (cDNA and RNA transcripts) representing the full-length genome of the wild-type HM-175 strain of hepatitis A virus experienced acute hepatitis and seroconversion to hepatitis A virus capsid proteins. The hepatitis was comparable in severity to that caused by infection with the wild-type virus. The viral cDNA and the hepatitis A virus recovered from the feces of an injected animal contained the same marker mutation. Therefore, intermediate cell culture steps can be omitted and the virulence of a hepatitis A virus encoded by a cDNA clone can be evaluated by direct transfection of marmosets.

Keywords

Virulent Virus African Green Monkey Kidney Chimeric Virus African Green Monkey Kidney Cell Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. U. Emerson
    • 1
    • 4
  • M. Lewis
    • 1
  • S. Govindarajan
    • 2
  • M. Shapiro
    • 3
  • T. Moskal
    • 3
  • R. H. Purcell
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Rancho Los Amigos Medical CenterDowneyUSA
  3. 3.Bioqual, Inc.RockvilleUSA
  4. 4.Hepatitis Viruses SectionBethesdaUSA

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