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The effect of 6-months l-deprenyl administration on pineal MAO-A and MAO-B activity and on the content of melatonin and related indoles in aged female Fisher 344N rats

  • G. F. Oxenkrug
  • P. J. Requintina
  • R. M. Correa
  • A. Yuwiler
Conference paper
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 41)

Summary

Six months of administration of the selective MAO-B inhibitor, selegiline (1-deprenyl 0.25mg/kg, s.c.) to aged female Fisher 344N rats suppressed MAO-A as well as MAO-B activity and increased serotonin (substrate for melatonin biosynthesis) and N-acetylserotonin (immediate melatonin precursor) levels in pineal glands taken from the animals during the night. Daytime values were unchanged by the treatment. The data suggest that stimulation of pineal melatonin biosynthesis might be one of the consequences of MAO-A inhibition contributing to life span prolongation induced by chronic selegiline treatment.

Keywords

Pineal Gland Pineal Melatonin Melatonin Biosynthesis Selegiline Administration Life Span Prolongation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. F. Oxenkrug
    • 1
  • P. J. Requintina
    • 1
  • R. M. Correa
    • 1
  • A. Yuwiler
    • 2
  1. 1.Pineal Research Laboratory, Psychiatry Service, VAMC, and Department of Psychiatry and Human BehaviorBrown University School of Medicine, Psychiatry Service, VAMCProvidenceUSA
  2. 2.Neurochemistry Laboratory, West Los Angeles Brentwood VAMC and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral SciencesUCLALos AngelesUSA

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