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Synergistic sedative effect of selective MAO-A, but not MAO-B, inhibitors and melatonin in frogs

  • P. J. Requintina
  • G. F. Oxenkrug
  • A. Yuwiler
  • A. G. Oxenkrug
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 41)

Summary

Total suppression of righting reflex in frogs (Rana pipiens, 25–35 mg b.w.) was observed after combined administration of melatonin (12.5 mg/kg) and selective inhibitors of MAO-A: clorgyline (2.5 mg/kg) and moclobemide (50 mg/kg) but not MAO-B: selegiline (25 mg/kg) and Ro-19-6327 (50 mg/kg). None of these drugs alone affected the righting reflex. Clorgyline and selegiline selectively inhibited brain MAO-A and MAO-B activity (by more than 90%), resp. Frogs might represent a convenient model to study the selective MAO-A and B type inhibitors since they provide the opportunity to correlate behaviour and biochemical changes induced by MAO inhibitors.

Keywords

Rana Pipiens Pineal Melatonin Melatonin Suppression Melatonin Injection Melatonin Biosynthesis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. J. Requintina
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. F. Oxenkrug
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Yuwiler
    • 3
    • 4
  • A. G. Oxenkrug
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Pineal Research LaboratoryPsychiatry Service, VAMCProvidenceUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Human BehaviorBrown University School of Medicine, T-20, VAMCProvidenceUSA
  3. 3.Neurochemistry LaboratoryVAMCWest Los Angeles, BrentwoodUSA
  4. 4.Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral SciencesUCLALos AngelesUSA

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