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Clorgyline effect on pineal melatonin biosynthesis in adrenalectomized rats pretreated with 6-hydroxydopamine

  • S. Reuss
  • P. J. Requintina
  • R. Riemann
  • G. F. Oxenkrug
Conference paper
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 41)

Summary

The response to administration of the specific monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) blocker clorgyline was investigated in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats which were adrenalectomized four days prior to treatment or were additionally sympathectomized as newborns by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine. In both groups, the contents of pineal indoles melatonin and N-acetylserotonin were augmented, and the contents of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and 5-hydroxyindoletryptophol decreased 90 min following clorgyline injections when compared to rats receiving saline. The observed responses were less pronounced in rats both adrenalectomized and sympathectomized. The results are in line with the hypothesis that preservation from oxidation of both MAO-A substrates, noradrenaline and serotonin, upon clorgyline administration contributes to the observed increase in melatonin biosynthesis thought to be associated with the antidepressant effects of MAO inhibition.

Keywords

Pineal Gland Superior Cervical Ganglion Melatonin Synthesis Pineal Melatonin BioI Psychiatry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Reuss
    • 1
  • P. J. Requintina
    • 2
  • R. Riemann
    • 1
  • G. F. Oxenkrug
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of AnatomyUniversity of MainzMainzFederal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Pineal Research Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry and Human BehaviorBrown University, and Psychiatry Service, VAMCProvidenceUSA

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