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The hepatitis B virus X gene product transactivates the HIV-LTR in vivo

  • Clara Balsano
  • O. Billet
  • Myriam Bennoun
  • Catherine Cavard
  • A. Zider
  • Gisele Grimber
  • G. Natoli
  • P. Briand
  • M. Levrero
Conference paper
Part of the Archives of Virology Supplementum book series (ARCHIVES SUPPL, volume 8)

Summary

It has previously been shown that the hepatitis B virus (HBV) X gene product, HBx, transactivates homologous and heterologous transcriptional regulatory sequences of viruses, including the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV1) long terminal repeat (LTR), and various cellular genes in vitro. To evaluate the transactivating function of HBx in vivo, we generated transgenic mice carrying the X open reading frame under the control of the human antithrombin III (ATIII) gene regulatory sequences. These mice express the 16 Kd HBx protein in the liver, as demostrated by immunoprecipitation studies. Crossbreeding of HBx mice with transgenics carrying either the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) bacterial or the lacZ reporter gene driven by the HIV1-LTR allowed us to demostrate, for the first time, the in vivo transactivating function of HBx protein.

Keywords

Long Terminal Repeat Chloramphenicol Acetyl Transferase Double Transgenic Mouse Double Transgenics Productive Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Clara Balsano
    • 1
    • 2
  • O. Billet
    • 1
  • Myriam Bennoun
    • 1
  • Catherine Cavard
    • 1
  • A. Zider
    • 1
  • Gisele Grimber
    • 1
  • G. Natoli
    • 2
  • P. Briand
    • 1
  • M. Levrero
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Genetique et Patologie ExperimentaleINSERM Institut Cochin de Genetique MoleculaireParisFrance
  2. 2.Laboratorio di Espressione Genica, Fondazione A. Cesalpino e I Clinica MedicaPoliclinico Umberto IRomeItaly

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