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SPICE Diode and MOSFET Models and Their Parameters

  • Narain Arora
Part of the Computational Microelectronics book series (COMPUTATIONAL)

Abstract

In this chapter we will discuss the pn junction diode and MOSFET models, as implemented in Berkeley SPICE2G and higher versions. No attempt will be made to derive the model equations, as that has already been done at appropriate places in previous chapters. Here we will only describe equations used to model different regions of device operation. Emphasis will be on model parameters required to run SPICE and how to measure them.

Keywords

Saturation Region Junction Capacitance Saturation Voltage Subthreshold Current Diode Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Narain Arora
    • 1
  1. 1.Digital Equipment CorporationHudsonUSA

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