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Tumors of the pineal region

  • Lucia Cecconi
  • Alfredo Pompili
  • Fabrizio Caroli
  • Ettore Squillaci

Abstract

The tumors originating in this site make up a heterogeneous group of neoplasms and account for approximately 1% of all intracranial tumors. Some derive from the parenchymal cells of the pineal gland: pineocytoma and pineoblastoma; others originate from the supporting tissues: tumors of glial origin; additionally, with greater incidence, others may originate from embryonic cell nests which do not belong to the pineal gland: germinomas and teratomas. In this site, papillomas of the choroid plexus and meningiomas are less frequent. Nontumoral space-occupying processes of the pineal gland, mostly arachnoid and parasitic cysts, will be discussed in a separate chapter.

Keywords

Pineal Gland Pineal Region Magnetic Resonance Contrast Agent Pineal Tumor Internal Cerebral Vein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lucia Cecconi
    • 1
  • Alfredo Pompili
    • 2
  • Fabrizio Caroli
    • 2
  • Ettore Squillaci
    • 3
  1. 1.Service of Radiology and Diagnostic ImagingUSA
  2. 2.Division of NeurosurgeryIstituto Regina ElenaRomeItaly
  3. 3.Institute of Radiology, Medical SchoolUniversità degli Studi di Roma ‘Tor Vergata’RomeItaly

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