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Introduction to magnetic resonance imaging

Fundamentals
  • Lucia Cecconi
  • Alfredo Pompili
  • Fabrizio Caroli
  • Ettore Squillaci

Abstract

The uniqueness of MR images lies in the physical origin of the signal. In X-rays, the radiation (X) is “absorbed” more by bones and less by soft tissues. Consequently, in X-rays (negative), bones appear as the bright part of the image, whereas soft tissues are darker. The same applies to ultrasonography. Ultrasounds cross the tissues and are absorbed by them in differing degrees. The resulting image reflects the different level of ultrasound absorption by the tissues. In both cases, the image results from the interaction between the X radiation or ultrasounds and the electronic structure of matter.

Keywords

Magnetic Field Static Magnetic Field Proton Density Larmor Frequency Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lucia Cecconi
    • 1
  • Alfredo Pompili
    • 2
  • Fabrizio Caroli
    • 2
  • Ettore Squillaci
    • 3
  1. 1.Service of Radiology and Diagnostic ImagingUSA
  2. 2.Division of NeurosurgeryIstituto Regina ElenaRomeItaly
  3. 3.Institute of Radiology, Medical SchoolUniversità degli Studi di Roma ‘Tor Vergata’RomeItaly

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