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Quality Assurance for Interstitial Radiofrequency-Induced Hyperthermia

  • S. D. Prionas
  • D. S. Kapp

Abstract

During the last decade, various interstitial techniques have been developed to induce and maintain hyperthermia (HT) in implantable solid deep-seated tumors. These techniques can be classified into two broad categories; those which utilize externally generated electromagnetic (EM) energy and a form of conversion of EM energy into heat [radiofrequency (RF) electrodes, capacitively-coupled RF implants, microwave (MW) antennas, and Curie point ferromagnetic seeds], and those which deliver energy in the form of heat with no need for an intermediate conversion (hot water tubes, low frequency resistive wire elements, and other hot source techniques). The principles of operation and detailed descriptions of the technical aspects of each heating delivery technique have been published elsewhere (Stauffer, 1989; Hand, 1990a; Hand, 1990b; International Consensus Report, 1990).

Keywords

Radiat Oncol Biol Phys Specific Absorption Rate Normal Surrounding Tissue Power Deposition Isolation Transformer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. D. Prionas
    • 1
  • D. S. Kapp
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Radiation OncologyStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA

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