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Simultaneous and Sequential Treatment with Radiation and Hyperthermia: A Comparative Assessment

  • M. R. Horsman
  • J. Overgaard

Abstract

Hyperthermia is a modality which on its own probably has no role to play in the curative treatment of tumours in humans (Overgaard, 1985). Its most likely clinical application is in combination with other cancer treatments, especially radiation. Numerous experimental studies have now established that moderate hyperthermia can enhance the response of animal tumours to ionizing radiation (for review, see Horsman and Overgaard, 1989). There is now also good evidence from clinical Phase I and II studies showing that heat can enhance the radiation effect to a significant degree in a variety of human tumours (Overgaard, 1989a). However, it is still not entirely clear as to how the radiation and heat should be combined clinically, in order to obtain the greatest therapeutic advantage. In the following chapter we would therefore like to discuss the basic mechanisms underlying the interaction between hyperthermia and radiation and then to consider how these modalities should be given to produce the maximal therapeutic benefit in a given clinical situation.

Keywords

Local Tumour Control Radiat Biol Moist Desquamation Sequential Radiation Interstitial Hyperthermia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. R. Horsman
    • 1
  • J. Overgaard
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Experimental Clinical OncologyDanish Cancer SocietyAarhusDenmark

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