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Multiinfarct dementia

  • H. Lechner
  • G. Bertha
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 33)

Summary

Clinicians have long recognized that dementia is a common symptom among the elderly. The diagnosis of dementia requires us to document the individual’s current level of mental functioning and some higher level of intellectual function in the past. The recognition of early or mild cases is specially difficult. Out of epidemiological studies it has been shown that the incidence for multi-infarct dementia (MID) increases with age and is slightly higher among men.

Keywords

Single Photon Emission Compute Tomography Vascular Dementia Intellectual Function Subcortical Dementia Futura Publishing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Lechner
    • 1
  • G. Bertha
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Neurology and PsychiatryUniversity of GrazGrazAustria
  2. 2.Department of Neurology and PsychiatryUniversity of GrazAustria

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