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MRI in basal ganglia diseases

  • D. Wimberger
  • L. Prayer
  • J. Kramer
  • H. Binder
  • H. Imhof
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 33)

Summary

76 patients suffering from different basal ganglia diseases (28 cases with M. Parkinson, secondary parkinsonism and Parkinson diseases; 5 cases with Chorea Huntington; 5 cases with Fahr disease and 38 cases with M. Wilson) MRI featured 2 characteristical patterns:
  1. 1.

    abnormal deposition of minerals,

     
  2. 2.

    focal atrophies of involved organs.

     
Thus MRI provides with informations about:
  1. 1.

    differential diagnosis in clinically misleading courses,

     
  2. 2.

    stage and, as a consequence, prognosis of some diseases,

     
  3. 3.

    biochemical processes of diseases in vivo.

     

Keywords

Basal Ganglion Parkinson Disease Multiple System Atrophy Vascular Risk Factor Basal Ganglion Lesion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Wimberger
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. Prayer
    • 2
    • 3
  • J. Kramer
    • 2
    • 3
  • H. Binder
    • 4
  • H. Imhof
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Neurological ClinicUniversity of Vienna Medical SchoolViennaAustria
  2. 2.MRI-InstituteUniversity of ViennaViennaAustria
  3. 3.Radiodiagnostic ClinicUniversity of Vienna and Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Radiological Physical Tumor DiagnosisViennaAustria
  4. 4.Neurological Hospital MariatheresienschlösselViennaAustria

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