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Pattern electroretinogram and luminance electroretinogram in Alzheimer’s disease

  • K. Strenn
  • P. Dal-Bianco
  • H. Weghaupt
  • G. Koch
  • C. Vass
  • I. Gottlob
Part of the Journal of Neural Transmission book series (NEURAL SUPPL, volume 33)

Summary

Visual symptoms are often among the first complaints of patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and several studies showed a delay in flash visual evoked potentials. Hinton et al. (1986) described optic nerve degenerations in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and Sadun published a dropout of retinal ganglion cells that range from 30% to 60%. The reduction of neurotransmitters, especially of acetylcholin, found in the brain might also occure in the retina. Therefore we examined the retinal functions of patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease.

In eight patients the pattern-electroretinograms and the scotopic and photopic luminance-electroretinograms were recorded and compared to an age-matched control group. We could not find any abnormalities in the pattern- and the luminance electroretinograms of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Although cholinergic cells have been found in the retina, our results did not reveal an involvement of retinal functions in Morbus Alzheimer.

Keywords

Retinal Ganglion Cell Retinal Function Cholinergic Cell Pattern Electroretinogram Presenile Dementia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Strenn
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. Dal-Bianco
    • 3
  • H. Weghaupt
    • 1
  • G. Koch
    • 3
  • C. Vass
    • 1
  • I. Gottlob
    • 1
  1. 1.First University Eye ClinicViennaAustria
  2. 2.Krankenhaus ScheibbsScheibbsAustria
  3. 3.University Clinic of NeurologyViennaAustria

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