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Analysis of MRI and SPECT in Patients with Acute Head Injury

  • H. Fumeya
  • K. Ito
  • O. Yamagiwa
  • N. Funatsu
  • T. Okada
  • S. Asahi
  • H. Ogura
  • M. Kubo
  • T. Oba
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

Traumatic lesions defined by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were divided into two groups according to findings on computed tomography (CT). This classification reflected difference in the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). In the contusional lesions which CT could demonstrate, rCBF varied from hyperperfusion to hypoperfusion, while it was almost always decreased in the lesions which CT could not detect. These results suggest that the former may include a mixture of brain oedema and hyperemia and the latter may imply brain oedema. MR imaging can reveal the minor oedema which CT fails to show in patients with acute head injury.

Keywords

Brain Oedema Cerebral Blood Volume Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Compute Tomog Traumatic Lesion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Fumeya
    • 1
  • K. Ito
    • 1
  • O. Yamagiwa
    • 1
  • N. Funatsu
    • 1
  • T. Okada
    • 1
  • S. Asahi
    • 1
  • H. Ogura
    • 1
  • M. Kubo
    • 1
  • T. Oba
    • 1
  1. 1.Yokohama Shintoshi Neurosurgical HospitalJokohamaJapan

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