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Survival and Fibre Outgrowth of Neuronal Cells Transplanted into Brain Areas Associated with Interstitial Oedema

  • T. Tsubokawa
  • Y. Katayama
  • S. Miyazaki
  • H. Ogawa
  • M. Koshinaga
  • K. Ishikawa
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

The influence of interstitial oedema on the survival of fetal raphe cells transplanted into serotonin (5-HT)-denervated rats and the fibre outgrowth from these cells was investigated. Fetal raphe cells were transplanted into the corpus callosum in which long-lasting interstitial oedema had been induced by intracisternal kaolin injection. The 5-HT and 5HIAA levels in the corpus callosum were restored to their maximum within 5–6 weeks post-transplantation regardless of whether interstitial oedema was induced or not. Furthermore, it was appeared that the presence of interstitial oedema even facilitated fibre growth as demonstrated by the 5-HT immunohistochemistry and the restoration of the 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels in brain areas distant from the transplantation sites. These results imply favourable effects of interstitial oedema on the survival of transplanted raphe cells and their fibre outgrowth.

Keywords

Corpus Callosum Interstitial Oedema Fibre Outgrowth Transplantation Site Anterior Corpus Callosum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Tsubokawa
    • 3
  • Y. Katayama
    • 1
  • S. Miyazaki
    • 1
  • H. Ogawa
    • 1
  • M. Koshinaga
    • 1
  • K. Ishikawa
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Departments of PharmacologyNihon University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyo 173Japan

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