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Early Pathomorphological Changes and Intracranial Volume-Pressure: Relations Following the Experimental Saggital Sinus Occlusion

  • K. Tychmanowicz
  • Z. Czernicki
  • M. Czosnyka
  • G. Pawlowski
  • G. Uchman
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

Saggital sinus occlusion was produced in cats. The intracranial volume-pressure relations were studied using the lumbar infusion tests. Right after occlusion ICP rised from 7.1 ± 1.8 to 12.4 ± 4.1 mmHg. The values of outflow resistance and volume-pressure response increased also and remained significantly unchanged with only slight decrease of the volume-pressure response. The morphometric study of the surface veins showed the dilatation of the veins draining to the occluded saggital sinus for about 10–20%. No signs of the blood-brain barrier disruption were observed.

Keywords

Brain Oedema Evans Blue Morphometric Study Outflow Resistance Lumbar Infusion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Tychmanowicz
    • 3
  • Z. Czernicki
    • 1
  • M. Czosnyka
    • 2
  • G. Pawlowski
    • 1
  • G. Uchman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurosurgery, Medical Research CentrePolish Academy of SciencesWarsawPoland
  2. 2.Warsaw University of TechnologyWarsawPoland
  3. 3.Department of Neurosurgery, Medical Research CentrePolish Academy of SciencesWarsawPoland

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