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Role of Neuroexcitation in Development of Blood-Brain Barrier and Oedematous Changes Following Cerebral Ischaemia and Traumatic Brain Injury

  • N. Saito
  • C. Chang
  • K. Kawai
  • F. Joó
  • T. S. NowakJr.
  • G. Mies
  • J. Ikeda
  • G. Nagashima
  • C. Ruetzler
  • J. Lohr
  • M. Spatz
  • I. Klatzo
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

Potential involvement of neuroexcitatory mechanisms was studied in: 1) repetitive forebrain ischaemia in gerbils, 2) global cerebral ischaemia in rats and 3) cryogenic injury to the cerebral cortex in rats and gerbils. Uptake of 45Ca was used as a marker of injury, whereas ultrastructural localization of calcium was assessed with an oxalate-pyroantimonate method. The blood-brain barrier was evaluated with immunostaining for serum albumin. Changes in extracellular glutamate were estimated by microdialysis and an enzymatic cycling assay. Changes in water content were assessed by specific gravity measurements.

Repetitive ischaemia of 3 × 5 min carotid occlusions produced a cumulative effect with regard to development of oedema and neuronal injury. This was associated with several-fold increments in glutamate release after repeated insults, whereas there was no apparent correlation with energy metabolism disturbances. Other studies revealed in all models a development of secondary foci distant to the primary impact of ischaemia or cold lesions, which were characterized by calcium accumulation in swollen dendrites, chronic neuronal changes and intraneuronal uptake of serum proteins, all of these changes being potentially compatible with involvement of neuroexcitatory mechanisms.

Keywords

Glutamate Release Excitatory Amino Acid Global Ischaemia Global Cerebral Ischaemia 45Ca Uptake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Saito
    • 1
  • C. Chang
    • 1
  • K. Kawai
    • 1
  • F. Joó
    • 1
  • T. S. NowakJr.
    • 1
  • G. Mies
    • 1
  • J. Ikeda
    • 1
  • G. Nagashima
    • 1
  • C. Ruetzler
    • 1
  • J. Lohr
    • 1
  • M. Spatz
    • 1
  • I. Klatzo
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Neuropathology and Neuroanatomical SciencesNational Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.National Institutes of Health, NIHBethesdaUSA

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