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Cellular Swelling During Cerebral Ischaemia Demonstrated by Microdialysis in vivo: Preliminary Data Indicating the Role of Excitatory Amino Acids

  • Y. Katayama
  • D. P. Becker
  • T. Tamura
  • T. Tsubokawa
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

When rapid cellular swelling occurs, water moves from the extracellular space (ECS) into the cells and the concentration of ECS markers which do not move into the cells increases. Cellular swelling during cerebral ischaemia has therefore been demonstrated in vivo as an increase in ECS markers which is measurable with intracerebral electrodes. We attempted to detect the cellular swelling by brain microdialysis employing a similar principle. Dialysis probes were placed in the hippocampus, and perfused for 20 min with 14C-sucrose as an ECS marker. The probes were subsequently perfused without 14C-sucrose and the dialysate concentration of 14C-sucrose was determined at 1-min intervals. The dialysate concentrations of 14C-sucrose suddenly became elevated 1–3 min after the onset of cerebral ischaemia, indicating the occurrence of cellular swelling. The present technique is useful because it enables the mechanism of cellular swelling to be analyzed by observing the effects of pharmacological agents administered through a dialysis probe. Preliminary data indicating the role of excitatory amino acids in producing cellular swelling during cerebral ischaemia are presented as an example.

Keywords

Cerebral Ischaemia Excitatory Amino Acid Quinolinic Acid Kynurenic Acid Dialysis Probe 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Katayama
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. P. Becker
    • 1
  • T. Tamura
    • 1
  • T. Tsubokawa
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Neurological SurgeryNihon University School of MedicineTokyo 173Japan
  2. 2.Division of NeurosurgeryUniversity of California at Los AngelesUSA

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