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Electrical Impedance, rCBF, Survival and Histology in Mongolian Gerbils with Forebrain Ischaemia

  • W. Stummer
  • K. Weber
  • L. Schürer
  • A. Baethmann
  • O. Kempski
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

Survival, quantitative morphology of the hippocampus, cerebral tissue impedance and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were studied in the Mongolian gerbil after 15 minutes of bilateral common carotid occlusion. A subgroup of animals was placed in cages with free access to running-wheels for two weeks preceeding ischaemia to measure voluntary locomotor activity. Survival was enhanced in the running-wheel subgroup, with 90% of the animals still alive after 14 days as compared to 48% of the non-running group. Neuronal loss was found in all animals in the hippocampus (CA 1, CA 2, CA 3 and CA 4), and was most pronounced in the CA 1 sector. In the running-wheel group, however, neuronal loss was significantly lower in sectors CA 2, CA 3 and CA 4. The increases of cerebral impedance, which indicate ischaemic cell swelling, reached 190% in both groups during ischaemia. During postischaemic recirculation, however, impedance normalized more rapidly in the running-wheel group, indicating earlier resolution of ischaemic cell swelling. In wheel-running gerbils, postischaemic hyperperfusion evolved earlier and was more pronounced as compared to non-runners. No differences in systemic blood pressure were observed during cerebral ischaemia or thereafter.

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Cerebral Ischaemia Electrical Impedance Mongolian Gerbil Forebrain Ischaemia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Stummer
    • 2
  • K. Weber
    • 1
  • L. Schürer
    • 1
  • A. Baethmann
    • 1
  • O. Kempski
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Surgical ResearchKlinikum GroßhadernMunichFederal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Institute for Surgical ResearchKlinikum GroßhadernMunich 70Federal Republic of Germany

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