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The Ambivalent Effects of Early and Late Administration of Mannitol in Cold-induced Brain Oedema

  • E. Reichenthal
  • T. Kaspi
  • M. L. Cohen
  • I. Shevach
  • E. Shalmon
  • Y. Bar-Ziv
  • Z. Feldman
  • G. Zucker
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

This study was undertaken in order to determine whether early administration of mannitol is different from late administration in its effect on brain oedema. Cold-induced brain oedema, which was confirmed by high resolution CT scan, was produced in 2 groups of cats. In group one mannitol was given early (90 minutes after injury); in group two 3–4 hours after the injury (late). Repeated CT scans following mannitol administration showed that the early group exhibited significantly greater dehydration (p < 0.0001) while the late group showed significant hydration, in the lesioned hemisphere. The contralateral control hemisphere responded to mannitol with similar dehydration effect in both groups.

Keywords

Brain Oedema Early Group Beer Sheva Water Gain Cold Probe 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Reichenthal
    • 4
  • T. Kaspi
    • 2
  • M. L. Cohen
    • 2
  • I. Shevach
    • 2
  • E. Shalmon
    • 2
  • Y. Bar-Ziv
    • 3
  • Z. Feldman
    • 1
  • G. Zucker
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of NeurosurgerySoroka Medical Center & the Ben Gurion UniversityBeer ShevaIsrael
  2. 2.Departments of NeurosurgeryBeilinson Medical Center Petach-TikvaIsrael
  3. 3.Departments of Neurosurgery“Hadassah” Medical Center JerusalemIsrael
  4. 4.Department of NeurosurgeryBeer ShevaIsrael

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