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Steroid and Hyperosmotic Diuretic Effects on the Early Phase of Experimental Vasogenic Oedema

  • Y. Handa
  • H. Kobayashi
  • H. Kawano
  • H. Ishii
  • Y. Naguchi
  • M. Hayashi
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

The effects of either dexamethasone or mannitol on the early phase of vasogenic oedema were studied by evaluating proton relaxation behaviour with in vitro NMR spectroscopy. Vasogenic cerebral oedema was induced by cold injury in cats. Significant (p < 0.05) decreases in both longitudinal relaxation rate (R1 = 1/T1) and transverse relaxation rate (R2 = 1/T2) and increases in water content were observed in the white matter beneath the cold lesions four hours after injury. In the dexamethasone treated group, the decrease in R2 in the oedematous white matter was significantly (p < 0.05) less than that in the non-treated control group and the mannitol group. The R2 in the oedematous white matter exhibited a two-component decay. The slow component of R2 in the dexamethasone-treated group was significantly (p < 0.05) smaller than that in the control group. Our results indicated that dexamethasone has a prophylactic effect on the early phase of vasogenic oedema by preventing the accumulation of fluid in the extracellular space and that mannitol had no prophylactic effect on oedema formation.

Keywords

Relaxation Rate Brain Oedema Vasogenic Oedema Steroid Group Cold Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Handa
    • 2
  • H. Kobayashi
  • H. Kawano
    • 1
  • H. Ishii
    • 1
  • Y. Naguchi
    • 1
  • M. Hayashi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryFukui Medical SchoolFukuiJapan
  2. 2.Department of NeurosurgeryFukui Medical SchoolMatsuoka-chou, Yoshida-gun, FukuiJapan

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