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The Effects of Cerebral Haemodynamics on the Progression of Cold-Induced Oedema

  • H. Kuchiwaki
  • S. Inao
  • M. Nagasaka
  • K. Andoh
  • T. Hirano
  • K. Sugita
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

A cold-injury lesion was made on the brain of 14 of 21 adult mongrel cats. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) were observed in both groups during the next 6 to 9 hours using a laser Doppler flow meter. Intracranial pressure (ICP), water contents, and blood pressure were also measured. Hyperemia frequently reached a peak early in the test period in the gray matter and somewhat later in the white matter. In a few cases, hyperemia was observed to occur late in the test period in the gray matter and even later in the white matter. The least frequent pattern was a continuous decrease of CBF and CBV in gray matter over time and of CBF in white matter. Intracranial pressure rose rapidly and correlated well with the early hyperemia. The water content was significantly increased in the white matter. However, the difference in the rate of the increment of the water content was not significant from 7–9 hours after injury. Hyperemia seems to cause the severe impairment of the microcirculation during oedema formation induced by cold injury. A time difference of hyperemia was detected in the gray matter and the white matter.

Keywords

White Matter Gray Matter Cerebral Blood Flow Cerebral Blood Volume Evans Blue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Overgaăd J, Tweed WA (1976) Cerebral circulation after head injury. Part 2: The effects of traumatic brain oedema. J Neurosurg 45: 292–300CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Sutton LN, Welsh F, Bruce DA (1980) Bioenergetics of acute vasogenic oedema. J Neurosurg 53: 470–476PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Kuchiwaki
    • 2
  • S. Inao
    • 1
  • M. Nagasaka
    • 1
  • K. Andoh
    • 1
  • T. Hirano
    • 1
  • K. Sugita
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryNagoya University School of MedicineNagoyaJapan
  2. 2.Department of NeurosurgeryNagoya University School of MedicineNagoya, Showa-Ku, Nagoya, 466Japan

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