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Leukotriene Production by Human Glia

  • S. R. Shepard
  • R. J. Hariri
  • R. Giannuzzi
  • K. Pomerantz
  • D. Hajjar
  • J. B. G. Ghajar
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

Elevated intracranial pressure and acute cerebrovascular changes following head injury remain the principle challenge in the management of traumatic brain injury. Recent work has demonstrated that leukotrienes can induce increases in blood brain barrier permeability and alter cerebrovascular dynamics. We investigated whether human astroglia in culture: 1. generate specific leukotrienes; 2. how they metabolize leukotrienes, and; 3. if astroglia generate leukotrienes in response to barotraumatic injury. Human astroglial cultures established from normal human brain obtained at surgery were exposed to either ionophore, exogenous 3 H-LTC4, or baro-traumatic injury. Supernatants were assayed for specific leukotrienes by one of three methods: HPLC, radioimmunoassay, or enzyme-immunoassay. Glial cells exposed to exogenous LTC4 metabolized nearly all of the LTC4 to LTD4 and LTE4 within 20 minutes. Glial cells stimulated with ionophore produced mostly LTC4 at five minutes after stimulation and LTD4 and LTE4 at fifteen minutes after stimulation. Glial cells subject to barotraumatic injury produced LTC4 in concentrations of 40–200 pg/ml 15 minutes after injury. These results demonstrate that human astroglial cells are capable of rapidly generating and degrading LTC4 and this capability of glial cells may play an important role in the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular changes following head injury.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Glial Cell Elevated Intracranial Pressure Increase Blood Brain Barrier Permeability Glial Cell Culture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. R. Shepard
    • 1
  • R. J. Hariri
    • 3
  • R. Giannuzzi
    • 1
  • K. Pomerantz
    • 2
  • D. Hajjar
    • 2
  • J. B. G. Ghajar
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Neurosurgery; Department of Surgery; and Laboratory of Vascular BiologyAitken Neurosurgery LaboratoryUSA
  2. 2.Department of PathologyCornell University Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Aitken Neurosurgery LaboratoryThe New York Hospital-Cornell Medical CenterNew YorkUSA

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