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Continuous Monitoring of Blood-Brain Barrier Opening to Cr51-EDTA by Microdialysis Following Probe Injury

  • O. Major
  • T. Shdanova
  • L. Duffek
  • Z. Nagy
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

Continuous detection of the permeability changes of the blood-brain (BB) interface became feasible with the recent development of the cerebral microdialysis technique6.

Vasogenic brain oedema was induced by the insertion of the dialysis capillary into the cerebral cortex of rats, and blood-brain transfer was measured with Cr51-EDTA as a blood-born tracer. The dialysis capillaries had an upper limit of 500 daltons (MW). Ringer solution was perfused through the dialysis tube. Samples were collected continuously. The permeability coefficient has been calculated from the radioactivity of the serum and of the washing fluid.

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Ringer Solution Interstitial Concentration Cerebral Microdialysis Vasogenic Brain Oedema 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Major
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. Shdanova
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. Duffek
    • 1
    • 3
  • Z. Nagy
    • 4
  1. 1.National Institute of NeurosurgeryBudapestHungary
  2. 2.Institute of Physiology Acad. Sci. USSRLeningradRussia
  3. 3.Department of Nuclear MedicineSemmelweis Medical University BudapestHungary
  4. 4.Department of PsychiatrySemmelweis Medical UniversityBudapestHungary

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