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MR Studies of Brain Oedema in the Developing Animal

  • A. V. Lorenzo
  • R. V. Mulkern
  • S. T. S. Wong
  • V. M. Colucci
  • F. A. Jolesz
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

Assessment of perinatal brain oedema is complicated by normal changes in brain water that accompany the marked physiological, biochemical and morphological alterations occurring during this phase of development. Multiexponential analysis of transverse decay curves (TDCs), derived from 128 echo CPMG images, of white matter (WM) made oedematous by either exposure of animals to triethyltin (TET) or cryogenic cortical lesions revealed a second, slower decay component not apparent in controls. More significantly, an obvious difference was noted between the TET and cryogenic lesion fast decay components which might serve as a basis to differentiate non-invasively cytotoxic and vasogenic oedemas.

Keywords

White Matter Brain Oedema Fast Component Vasogenic Oedema Brain Water Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. V. Lorenzo
    • 2
  • R. V. Mulkern
    • 1
  • S. T. S. Wong
    • 1
  • V. M. Colucci
    • 1
  • F. A. Jolesz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyBrigham Women’s HospitalBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of NeurosurgeryChildren’s HospitalBostonUSA

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