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Automated Time-averaged Analysis of Craniospinal Compliance (Short Pulse Response)

(Short Pulse Response)
  • I. R. Piper
  • J. D. Miller
  • I. R. Whittle
  • A. Lawson
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

We have developed an automated method [Short Pulse Response (SPR)] of measuring craniospinal compliance using an electronic square wave pressure generator to produce a small (0.05 ml) and reproducible transient volume increase in the CSF space (pulse duration 100 msec). In experimental models of intracranial hypertension, arterial hypertension, arterial hypotension and arterial hypercarbia in cats, the new method accurately followed pyhsiological changes in compliance when compared to the manual volume-pressure injection method. The VPR overestimated compliance compared to the new SPR method (by 20% to 162%, mean = 77%). The SPR method was less variable between sequential measurements with a coefficient of variation (CV) ranging from 0.6% to 9.6% (mean CV = 2.6%), compared with a CV ranging from 5.6% to 48% (mean CV = 17%) for the VPR method. Repeated compliance measurements by the new method over a 12 hour period, produced no neuropathological evidence of either blood brain barrier breakdown or tissue damage resulting from the repeated volume injections.

Keywords

Blood Brain Barrier Breakdown Peak Input Wave Pressure Generator Neuropathological Evidence Spinal Fluid Pulse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. R. Piper
    • 1
  • J. D. Miller
    • 2
  • I. R. Whittle
    • 1
  • A. Lawson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical NeurosciencesEdinburghScotland
  2. 2.Department of Clinical NeurosciencesWestern General HospitalEdinburghScotland

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