Advertisement

Dynamics of Tracer Distribution in Radiation Induced Brain Oedema in Rats

  • J. V. Lafuente
  • E. Pouschman
  • J. Cervós-Navarro
  • H. S. Sharma
  • C. Schreiner
  • M. Korves
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

The dynamic behaviour of the distribution of Evans blue (EB), sodium fluorescein (SF), Lucifer yellow (LY) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was studied using standard light- and fluorescence microscopy following ultraviolet radiation induced brain oedema in the rat model. The cerebral cortex was irradiated after craniotomy (2 × 2 mm) under anaesthesia. The tracers were injected (iv) 30 min prior to radiation. Animals were perfused with glutaraldehyde through the heart at different survival periods ranging from 30 min to 24 h post irradiation. The results showed a remarkable difference in distribution and spread of these tracers in the oedematous brain following radiation. The extravasation of EB was evident in ipsilateral cortex 6 h after radiation which extended to the contralateral side at the end of the 24 h survival period. The HRP reaction product was seen in the necrotic area 3 h after radiation which further extended to the underlying white matter at 24 h survival. The LY stained the ipsilateral micronecrotic area 6 h after radiation, whereas a non-specific diffuse fluorescence of SF was noted at this time period. These results point out a specific selectivity of tracer distribution in oedematous brain following ultraviolet radiation.

Keywords

Survival Period Evans Blue Lucifer Yellow Tracer Distribution Vibratome Section 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Artigas J, Aruffo C, Sampaola S, Cruz-Sànchez F, Ferszt R, Cervòs-Navarro J (1987) Lucifer yellow as morphofunctional tracer of the blood brain barrier. In: Cervòs-Navarro J, Ferszt R (eds) Stroke and microcirculation. Raven Press, New York, pp 239–244Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Houthoff HJ, Go KG, Huitema S (1981) The permeability of cerebral capillary endothelium in cold injury: comparison of an endogenous and exogenous protein tracer. In: Cervòs-Navarro J, Fritschka E (eds) Cerebral microcirculation and metabolism. Raven Press, New York, pp 331–336Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Lafuente JV, Cervòs-Navarro J (1989) Variaciones del volumen tisular en un modelo de oedema cerebral experimental. Arch Neurobiol 52: 1–36Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Olsson Y, Sharma HS, Petterson CAV (1990) Effects of p-chlorophenylalanine on microvascular permeability changes occurring in spinal cord trauma. An experimental study in the rat using 131I-sodium and lanthanum tracers. Acta Neuropathol 79: 595–603PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Sharma HS, Olsson Y, Dey PK (1990) Changes in blood-brain barrier and cerebral blood flow following elevation of circulating serotonin level in anaesthetized rats. Brain Res (in press)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Mayhan WG, Heistad DD (1985) Permeability of blood-brain barrier to various sized molecules. Am J Physiol 248: H712 - H718PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Vass K, Tomida S, Hossmann KA, Nowak TS, Klatzo I (1988) Microvascular disturbances and oedema formation after repetitive ischaemia of gerbil brain. Acta Neuropathol (Berl) 75: 288–294CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. V. Lafuente
    • 1
  • E. Pouschman
    • 1
  • J. Cervós-Navarro
    • 2
  • H. S. Sharma
    • 2
  • C. Schreiner
    • 2
  • M. Korves
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeurosciencesUPVLejonaSpain
  2. 2.Institute of NeuropathologyFree UniversityBerlinGermany

Personalised recommendations