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Polyamine Accumulation and Vasogenic Oedema in the Genesis of Late Delayed Radiation Injury of the Central Nervous System (CNS)

  • P. H. Gutin
  • M. W. Mcdermott
  • G. Ross
  • P. H. Chan
  • S. F. Chen
  • K. J. Levin
  • O. Babuna
  • L. J. Marton
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

Polyamine (PA) accumulation has been associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and vasogenic oedema after cold injury. PAs and water content were measured in a rat spinal cord model of late-delayed radiation injury and were found to be elevated at paralysis. The elevated PA levels could be significantly reduced by treatment with difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). In unirradiated rats DFMO reduced putrescine to undetectable levels after 10–12 weeks. These data suggest that blockade of PA synthesis may be useful in treating the vasogenic oedema of radiation injury and may improve CNS radiation tolerance.

Keywords

Evans Blue Vasogenic Oedema Radiation Injury Cold Injury Spinal Cord Blood Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. H. Gutin
    • 1
  • M. W. Mcdermott
    • 1
  • G. Ross
    • 1
  • P. H. Chan
    • 1
  • S. F. Chen
    • 1
  • K. J. Levin
    • 1
  • O. Babuna
    • 1
  • L. J. Marton
    • 1
  1. 1.Brain Tumour Research CenterUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA

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