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Measurement of Brain Tissue Density Using Pycnometry

  • G. R. DiResta
  • J. Lee
  • N. Lau
  • F. Ali
  • J. H. Galicich
  • E. Arbit
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

A novel method to measure specific gravity (SG) of tissues, pycnometry (PYC), is described. This method utilizes a 2 ml glass pycnometer filled with distilled H2O to determine the displacement volume of a tissue sample and an equation to compute SG from the sample’s weight and the pycnometer’s weight before and after adding the sample. The PYC method was validated using glass SG standards over the range 1.02–1.26, and against the column density gradient (DG) method using brain tissue from 250–300 g male rats. Factors which affect PYC accuracy, i.e. sample size, were also evaluated. Our results indicate that PYC SG values are highly correlated with the glass SG standards (slope = 1.0107, r = 0.9955, p < 0.001), and highly correlated with DG when ~0.120 ml tissue samples are used in the pycnometer. The DG method was preferable to the PYC method, however, when small tissue samples, i.e. 0.60 ml or less, were used.

Keywords

Specific Gravity Specific Gravity Local Cerebral Blood Flow Small Tissue Sample Vasogenic Brain Oedema 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. R. DiResta
    • 2
  • J. Lee
    • 1
  • N. Lau
    • 1
  • F. Ali
    • 1
  • J. H. Galicich
    • 1
  • E. Arbit
    • 1
  1. 1.Neurosurgical Research LaboratoryMemorial Sloan Kettering Cancer CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Nuclear Medicine Research LaboratoryMemorial Sloan Kettering Cancer CenterNew YorkUSA

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