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Local Cerebral Blood Flow and Glucose Metabolism in Hydrostatic Brain Oedema

  • H. Umezawa
  • K. Shima
  • H. Chigasaki
  • K. Sato
  • S. Ishii
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

Two hydrostatic factors such as acute hypertension and decompressive craniectomy were chosen and assessment was focused on how the hydrostatic pressure gradient altered the cerebrovascular dynamics and metabolism during the process of development of brain oedema. Hydrostatic oedema was induced by bolus injection of autologous blood through the common carotid artery in Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were divided into two groups, one with craniectomy (Cr+) and the other without craniectomy (Cr−). Animals were sacrificed immediately, 24 and 48 h after the hypertensive insult. Brain water content was determined by the gravimetric method. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and glucose metabolism (lCGU) were measured by quantitative autoradiographic methods using 14 C-iodoantipyrine and 14 C-deoxyglucose, respectively. The hypertensive insult produced multifocal lesions stained by Evans blue. In the brains of the Cr− group, there was a transient increase in water content and no significant change of rCBF and ICGU. In the Cr+ group, the increase in water content was pronounced and continued until 48 h later. In addition, misery perfusion was observed at 24 h after the insult and both rCBF and ICGU were significantly decreased after 48 h. These results indicate that the increased hydrostatic pressure gradient enhances tissue damage and causes the reopening of blood-brain barrier.

Keywords

Evans Blue Decompressive Craniectomy Brain Water Content Left Common Carotid Artery Infusion Pressure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Umezawa
    • 1
  • K. Shima
    • 1
  • H. Chigasaki
    • 1
  • K. Sato
    • 2
  • S. Ishii
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryNational Defence Medical College SaitamaJapan
  2. 2.Department of NeurosurgeryJuntendo University TokyoJapan

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