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Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Caused by Impairment of Cerebral Autoregulation During Chronic Cerebral Vasospasm in Primates

  • Y. Handa
  • H. Takeuchi
  • M. Kabuto
  • H. Kobayashi
  • H. Kawano
  • K. Hosotani
  • M. Hayashi
Conference paper
Part of the Acta Neurochirurgica book series (NEUROCHIRURGICA, volume 51)

Summary

Impairment of the cerebral autoregulation and its effects on the development of brain oedema during chronic cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) were studied in primates. The unilateral induction of SAH by clot placement around cerebral arteries produced a moderate degree of vasospasm (more than 40% reduction of vessel caliber on angiogram) seven days after SAH. Abolishment of autoregulation was observed in the territories of the cerebral hemisphere supplied by the vasospastic arteries. It was found that in this region an increase in cerebral perfusion pressure easily produced a marked elevation of the cerebral blood flow over the upper limit of autoregulation threshold resulting in disruption of the blood-brain barrier.

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Cerebral Perfusion Pressure Cerebral Autoregulation Vessel Caliber Impaired Autoregulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Handa
    • 1
  • H. Takeuchi
  • M. Kabuto
  • H. Kobayashi
  • H. Kawano
  • K. Hosotani
  • M. Hayashi
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryFukui Medical SchoolMatsuoka-chou, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-11Japan

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